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May 1, 2011 12:00 AM


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Family ties: Bob Ott celebrates 66 years in printing

Every day, without fail, whether a weekday or weekend, Robert B. Ott Sr. walked into The Hennegan Co. office wearing a white shirt and tie. In honor of his final day on the job, the entire office wore white shirts and ties.

“I've just always worn a tie, and I didn't stop when everything got more casual,” says Ott, who served as president of the company for his entire 66-year career. “Until recently, ties were commonplace.”

Ott retired on April 2, 2011. Bob started at Hennegan on April 2, 1946 after an abbreviated college education and service in the Coast Guard during WWII. He is the son of Ben and Ann Hennegan Ott and grandson of Hennegan's founder. Sons Bob Jr. and Kevin also work in the business as president/CEO and vice president, respectively.

See www.hennegan.com.

Remembering Jack Iacovelli

“Jack Iacovelli was a legendary character in the printing industry for more than 30 years,” writes Geno Paesano. “There are many dealers and printers who owe him a debt of gratitude for his knowledge, generosity and friendship.”

Iacovelli died this past February at age 70. He was the regional vice president of ATF-Davidson for more than 20 years. He joined Omni Adast in 1986. He became national sales manager in 1989, and executive vice president of Omnitrade Industrial in 1994.

“Jack was a staunch dealer advocate and a vigorous supporter of the printer,” Paesano remembers. “He earned a reputation for candor and the integrity of his handshake.”

An inspiration in Indianapolis

In 1989, Hoosiers Mike and Janet Wadsworth founded what became Red Line Graphics Inc. The couple owned retail shoe stores — in-store material requirements led them to the graphic arts. At the same time, Mike was climbing the corporate ladder in the dairy and grocery business. On the printing side, the company acquired 18 companies over a 10-year span.

In July 1990, Mike had a near fatal auto accident. Mike quit his corporate job, and he and Janet renamed their print shop. The Red Line Graphics name refers to the indicator on a cardiac monitor. Mike “red-lined” twice before being airlifted from one hospital to another.

Mike is now dealing with Stage IV multiple myeloma, a rare and incurable blood cancer. “I asked God to slow me down and this is the path he chose for me and I've accepted it,” says Wadsworth, who has undergone two stem cell transplants. “I've had three trial drug runs. I've opened myself up to be a medical guinea pig so that doctors might find a solution for others in the future.”

See www.redlinegrp.com.

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