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Graph Expo 2004 New Products, Part 1

Dec 1, 2004 12:00 AM, AP staff

New products from: Mohawk, Stevens Graphics, Fox Printing, Stora Enso, Drabbe, Flint Ink, Duplo, Handschy Industries, NPES, Delphanx Technologies, Mitsubishi Paper Mills, Creo, Encad, Vutek, Agfa, Heidelberg, Pantone, X-Rite, Xerox, Midland Communications, XMPie, KBA, Standard Finishing Systems, ICS, CGS, Esko-Graphics, LithoTechnics, INX, Konica Minolta Business Solutions, Colter & Peterson, Muller Martini, Jetrion, Videojet Technologies, and Enfocus.

Graph Expo 2004 New Products, Part 2

Dec 1, 2004 12:00 AM, AP staff

Must See ‘Em winners and new products from: Mohawk, Stevens Graphics, Fox Printing, Stora Enso, Drabbe, Flint Ink, Duplo, Handschy Industries, NPES, Delphanx Technologies, Mitsubishi Paper Mills, Creo, Encad, Vutek, Agfa, Heidelberg, Pantone, X-Rite, Xerox, Midland Communications, XMPie, Unimac Graphics, Standard Finishing Systems, ICS, CGS, Esko-Graphics, LithoTechnics, INX, Konica Minolta Business Solutions, Colter & Peterson, Muller Martini, Jetrion, Videojet Technologies, and Enfocus.

CTP from A to Z

Jun 1, 2004 12:00 AM, By Katherine O'Brien

Drupa's plate and platesetter developments included the following highlights: Several companies joined Presstek on the chemistry-free/processless plate front; most run lengths were under 75,000 impressions. Agfa's and Kodak Polychrome Graphics' (KPG) products are commercially available; Creo's and Fuji's are still under development. Drawing upon its Hell, Linotronics and Hercules electronics heritage,

Drupa developments 3

May 1, 2004 12:00 AM,

JDF-enabled workflow, press innovations Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG (Heidelberg) (Heidelberg, Germany) will offer more than 50 innovations at Drupa. Its modular, JDF-enabled Prinect workflow components reportedly integrate business-management and technical functions into one comprehensive data and workflow. Said to be adaptable to each printing company's individual requirements, the Prinect family

Drupa developments 2

Apr 1, 2004 12:00 AM, By Katherine O'Brien and the AP staff

HumanEyes (Jerusalem) says its imaging science enables just about anyone to create 3-D pictures of up to 360 degrees and other lenticular effects (flip, morph, zoom and layered 3-D) for print and on displays or monitors. Using any high-end digital camera, the user captures the desired image. Then, through mathematical algorithms developed at Hebrew University, HumanEyes'

Drupa developments 1

Mar 1, 2004 12:00 AM, by Katherine O'Brien

Drupa developments

Color Incorporated: from CEPS to CTP

Nov 1, 2003 12:00 AM, AP staff

A Q & A with Color Incorporated, a Glendale, CA high-end color printer serving packaging, corporate and entertainment-industry clients.

Graph Expo 2003

Nov 1, 2003 12:00 AM, by Katherine O'Brien, Editor | kobrien@primediabusiness.com

A review of the best of Graph Expo 2003.

Why DI?

Aug 1, 2003 12:00 AM, by Mayu Mishina, Managing editor | mmishina@primediabusiness.com

Direct-imaging (DI) presses take advantage of two of the biggest trends in the graphic-arts market: short runs and digital workflows. Because DI presses feature on-press imaging rather than plates being made on a CTP device and then mounted on press they are said to boast automatic register and speedy makeready, key factors in a short-run printing environment. Current makeready times on these presses

Quality-control DOs and DON'Ts

Jul 1, 2003 12:00 AM, by GATF technical staff | APeditor@primediabusiness.com

Quality-control DOs and DON'Ts

CTP's co-existing technologies

May 1, 2003 12:00 AM, By K. Richard Littrell, Principal, Littrell Associates, and AP staff | APeditor@primediabusiness.com

Violet and thermal vendors target midrange users In the mid-1990s, CTP options were scarce and users were scarcer. Early adopters included book and financial printers that bought large-format platesetters for single- and limited-color work, followed by magazine and catalog printers. In 2001, PIA (Alexandria, VA) found that about one-half of U.S. commercial web printers had CTP capability, compared

CTP 101

Apr 1, 2003 12:00 AM, by Hal Hinderliter, President, Hal Hinderliter Consulting Services | hal@halhinderliter.com

Successfully implementing CTP requires printers to manage the transition to a dramatically transformed manufacturing process. This article will review key concerns for quick and small commercial printers evaluating an all-digital workflow. When you eliminate film in favor of bits and bytes, your digital infrastructure must be able to keep up with production. You'll need up-to-date hardware and software

a commitment to pressroom integration

Nov 1, 2002 12:00 AM,

Survival of the Fittest was Komori's Graph Expo show theme. With 10 live demonstrations per day, visitors had many opportunities to see Komori products in action. Given the current state of the economy, printers need to find ways to maximize their capacity, while keeping costs under control, observes Stephan Carter, president and COO of Komori America Corp. Komori is committed to helping customers

Film is surviving but is it thriving?

Jan 1, 2002 12:00 AM, by Scott Bury, Contributing editor | APeditor@primediabusiness.com

Despite all the apparent signs to the contrary, computer-to-film is still alive if not kicking in a particularly robust manner in the U.S. marketplace, reports Barry Happ, principal of Vantage Strategic Marketing (VSM), a UK graphic arts consultancy that published the Direct-to Technologies 2000-2005 report in mid-2001. In a nutshell: Film ain't dead yet. Imagesetters have, in fact, outsold platesetters

Computer-to-plate or computer-to-press?

Mar 1, 2001 12:00 AM, by Don Monkerud, Contributing editor | APeditor@primediabusiness.com

What's on your mind? "Staying state-of-the-art" was the top concern cited by 61.4 percent of the participants in NAPL's (Paramus, NJ) State of the Industry survey. And the No. 2 concern? "Shortage of skilled prodcution personnel," cited by 57.9 percent. Direct-imaging (DI) and computer-to-plate (CTP) technology can help printers address both of these concerns. But how do you determine which is right

four-up goes mainstream

Jan 1, 2001 12:00 AM, By Don Monkerud

Though printers still need to carefully consider plates and features, cost and technology are no longer barriers to four-up CTP adoptionWhile technological advances made in the CTP area may have less to do with adoption rates than with digital workflow and customer demands for faster job turnaround, CTP manufacturers have nevertheless unveiled an array of new four-up platesetters. By lowering the

Imagesetters and beyond: CTP options for quick printers

Jan 1, 2001 12:00 AM, by Katherine O'Brien, Editor | kobrien@primediabusiness.com

Much has been written about new CTP options for midsize and larger commercial printers. But what if you're a smaller printer and can't justify investing in a thermal, violet or UV platesetter? What if a digital press doesn't figure into your plans?Not to worry - there's a CTP solution for you, too. Options for quick printers include converted

Best practices for computer-to-plate

Nov 1, 2000 12:00 AM, By Mayu Mishina

Seven habits of highly effective CTP users The first time Scoville Press went digital, it failed miserably. A year earlier, in 1995, management of the Plymouth, MN, commercial printer had proactively developed a master plan to transition from its conventional workflow to a digital one. It was less of a transition than it was a sudden switch: "We went from Friday conventional to Monday digital. It

Choices 2000: What's new in CTP

Oct 1, 2000 12:00 AM, MAYU MISHINA

NEW AND EXISTING TECHNOLOGIES OFFER COMPUTER-TO-PLATE OPTIONS FOR ALL PRINTERS The many introductions into the computer-to-plate (CTP) arena at Drupa 2000 and Graph Expo are a boon for printers seeking platesetter options.With these entries have come discussions over the merits of violet technology versus thermal, and the potential of processless plates in the future.Agfa unveiled the 430-nm Galileo

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY DOMINATES

Jul 1, 2000 12:00 AM, KATHERINE O'BRIEN

Drupa highlights include computer-to-plate and direct imaging presses.Drupa had it all: cheerleaders, violinists, circus performers, stilt walkers, opera singers, soccer stars, scooters and a theme song played twice daily at a soaring decibel level seldom achieved outside the deck of an aircraft carrier. While these distractions will soon be distant memories, the digital technology that dominated