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NEXGEN: YOUNG LEADERS WINTER 2014

Jan 21, 2014 12:00 AM


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5 PRINT 13 PROJECTS I’LL NEVER FORGET

BY CARLA CRANDALL

My road to PRINT 13 began with my internship with Rochester Software Associates (RSA), a critical part of the curriculum for my degree in new media interactive development. This internship provided me with hundreds of hours of invaluable experience. I participated in every phase of the project and gained new respect for all of the work required to develop a successful trade show exhibit.

Without the support of EDSF and companies like RSA, students like me might never gain such practical experience. How important was this to me? To paraphrase a popular credit card commercial, it was priceless!

Here’s a summary of some of the PRINT 13–related work I did:

ADVERTISEMENTS
We created full-page printed advertisements for the PRINT 13 Show Directory and the August 2013 issue of In-Plant Graphics magazine. To complement these ads, we developed a variety of web ads (static and animated) to advertise RSA’s sessions and show activities.

WEB
Our team prepared press releases, press kits and flyers. We also created a web page to serve as a convenient hub for all of RSA’s PRINT 13 press resources. I created presentation graphics for RSA-sponsored sessions and events as well as the company’s online show listing.

VIDEOS
A major part of our PRINT 13 integrated plan involved three videos we filmed for customers and prospects highlighting RSA’s innovations. These videos ran on both the RSA and GASC YouTube channels.

POCKET GUIDE
RSA and Ricoh collaborated on this creative piece for in-plant attendees. We produced a guide of activities that could be folded to fit nicely into a pocket or a trade show badge holder.

TRADE SHOW BOOTH
This was my favorite project! I designed the graphics for the booth, including the four sides of the “cube,” the front and back of the kiosk banners, and the front of the greeting station. This was challenging but extremely rewarding.

A FASCINATION WITH PRINTED ELECTRONICS AND FUNCTIONAL PRINTING

BY SEAN GARNSEY

I am now entering my fourth and final year at Cal Poly’s Graphic Communication (GrC) Program. Over the past three years, I have had the opportunity to run a print enterprise, publish technical journals, design products for local businesses and do market analyses for companies halfway across the country

HOW I SPENT MY SUMMER VACATION

Printed electronics and functional printing fascinate me. Functional printing is the development of print processes that serve a functional, non-graphic purpose—basically, anything that isn’t just CMYK inks on paper. It is a subcategory of specialty print. The popular topics in functional print today are 3D printing, printed OLEDs and security (ultra-resolution) printing.

Last summer I interned with a research company in Heidelberg, Germany, called InnovationLab Gmbh. I learned about the science behind organic electronics, the use of organic (carbon-based) conductive and semi-conductive polymers to create printed electronic devices. Over the summer, I worked on the production of printed flexible lighting known as light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs).

Here are my impressions from this experience:

1) The field of functional print and printed electronics is very promising. We will enter into a new age of product design that integrates low-cost electronics with printed collateral and other areas.

2) It just isn’t there yet. Printed electronics adds a new dimension of physical conditions that must be met in order for a product to be operable. This new dimension means that the physical qualities of print that used to be somewhat irrelevant (such as surface homogeneity and ink-film thickness) are now crucial

3) But it will get there. We need pioneers and risk-takers to enter this industry, and we need more collaboration between printers, chemists, engineers and physicists in order to make it happen.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR ME

My goal is to become a pioneer and contributor for the printed electronics industry. Currently, the field of printed electronics is largely made up of chemists, materials scientists and physicists. But now is the time for printing companies to get involved—while the window of opportunity is still wide open!

SEAN GARNSEY is a senior at Cal Poly and the recipient of the Franchise Services, Inc., PIP Scholarship as well as the EDSF Board of Directors Scholarship.

Sean’s commercial for the student-run print operation: UGS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7HQ_DPDG80

Key FORSCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION INFORMATION B2Me.me/C42

Go to B2Me.me/C38 to check out what other scholarship recipients are up to.