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Quebecor World launches new multichannel program

Nov 24, 2008 12:00 AM


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Quebecor World Inc. (Montreal) has announced the launch of store.driver, a compact, customizable direct mail solution that drives traffic to retail stores from multiple channels. Store.driver is offered as part of Quebecor World’s Integrated Multichannel Solutions (IMCS) program.

“We saw an opportunity to create a new IMCS solution. One that gives our multichannel retail customers the ability to offer specific incentives to consumers who purchase products at the store,” says Mike Bloomfield, executive vice president, sales, Quebecor World Marketing Solutions Group. “With the growing demand for increased marketing return on investment, our store.driver solution provides a unique alternative that will hold the line on postage and distribution costs for direct-to-consumer marketers.”

Based on customer feedback from Quebecor World’s launch of net.driver, a companion IMCS solution, store.driver was designed with multiple channel options to drive consumer behavior. These options incorporate various personalized print incentives including store maps, fragrance sampling, scratch-offs, targeted coupons and Track Card to gain valuable consumer insight.

To further entice consumers into the store utilizing multiple channels simultaneously, Quebecor World has created an optional feature that bundles the printed store.driver with corresponding e-mail and data driven microsites.

“Store.driver is produced completely in-line so we are able to offer our customers a highly personalized piece with an unprecedented turnaround time of only three days from file sign-off to mail,” says Barry Bogle, vice president, business development, Quebecor World Marketing Solutions Group. “Store.driver will also qualify for lower-cost, automated letter-rate postage given its unique size,” says Barry Bogle.