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Celebrating the California connection

Mar 1, 2011 12:00 AM


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Good thing they didn't give him a gold watch

When Mike Stinnett retired from Royal Oak High in Michigan, his fellow graphic arts teachers presented him with the perfect gift: a section from a California Job Case. The case contents reflect Stinnett's eight years of service to the school. Charlie Chard, a fellow retiree, helped Stinnett convert the job case into an end table.

The red oak table, complete with two drawers, also incorporates a Hamilton Type Bank. Chard and Stinnett also collaborated on a coffee table with a California Job Case as its centerpiece. The coffee table was a 3.5-day project — the end table only required 2.5 days. “We started talking about this more than three years ago, but it took us both being retired to find the time,” says Stinnett.

Learn more about the meaning behind the tables' contents at http://blog.americanprinter.com/kob.

Skip the Jif, choose print

Printing Industries Assn. of Southern California (PIASC) launched its “Choose Print” initiative in January. “It's an educational campaign to promote the value of print and to reinforce the fact that print is a recyclable, renewable and sustainable environmental choice,” says PIASC's Bob Lindgren. With more than 1,300 member companies, PIASC is the largest local graphic arts trade association in the United States. See www.chooseprint.org.

Rawson has the right stuff

PIASC calls Superior Lithographics' Doug Rawson “a perfect example of [a] hard working and innovative entrepreneur.” The association will honor Rawson with its executive of the year award during its Graphics Night on March 26, 2011.

Rawson grew up in Roslyn, a Long Island suburb. Shortly after graduating from college, he got his start as a salesperson with Viking Criterion Paper in New York. Rawson moved west and began brokering some package work. In 1987, he launched Superior Litho with a used press and a crew of five. Today, the $20 million company has 75 employees. “I constantly ask how we can respond to our customers better and faster,” says Rawson. “The guiding philosophy is speed to market and providing the highest level of service.”

See www.superiorlithographics.com.

We're gonna need a bigger box

Superior Litho is located in an industrial center outside of Los Angeles in a 60,000-sq.-ft. facility with 75 employees. It's known for large-format printing of litho sheets and top sheets for the corrugated box industry, as well folding cartons.

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